Passion

A Tribute the length of the Mille Miglia

A Tribute the length of the Mille Miglia

One hundred Ferraris on parade in the 'most beautiful race in the world'

From its first edition, in 1927, to its last, held in 1957, the philosophy behind the Mille Miglia remained the same – a circular race, beginning and ending in Brescia and stopping off in Rome on the way. It was an instant success, taken into the hearts of fans and car lovers to the extent that it earned the title of 'the most beautiful race in the world'. Although today it may be held more as a regularity race than as a standard race, the Mille Miglia nonetheless retains its fascination, thanks to both the roads and landscapes it covers and the exceptional fleet of cars that take part. What these cars have in common is a very specific requirement – they must have been produced before 1957 and have taken part in (or been entered for) the original race.

Ferrari created unforgettable moments in the golden years of the Mille Miglia. One need only think of its 1-2-3 finishes in both 1956 and 1957, 1-2 finishes in 1949 and 1950, and six consecutive wins from 1948 to 1953. To celebrate its eight victories in the Brescia-based race, the last by Piero Taruffi, and to give its customers the extraordinary opportunity to take part in commemorating and recreating a historic race, the Prancing Horse has put on the Ferrari Tribute to Mille Miglia since 2010.

This year, as always, the event has generated huge interest and excitement among Ferrari lovers around the world, who are brought together by the occasion. The 2019 race will begin in Desenzano on 15 May and end, as tradition dictates, in Brescia on 18 May. It will take place over a route divided into four legs, all of them featuring Mille Miglia cars. The first leg will see the Tribute's one hundred Ferraris go from the starting town, overlooking Lake Garda, to the Milano Marittima area of Cervia, passing Mantua – Tazio Nuvolari's hometown – Ferrara and Ravenna on the way.

The second leg, held on 16 May, will see the convoy set out for the capital at 5.15 a.m., crossing the Central Apennines and stopping for a quick brunch in Fabriano. Around 7 p.m., the first cars should start arriving in Rome, where they will perform a spectacular procession through the city centre. The programme for the rally allows for no breaks, and the cars will set off again at 5.15 a.m. on Friday, headed for Modena. In car country, a few miles from the place where they were made, the Ferraris will stop in the square in front of the Military Academy, before setting out at 6.30 a.m. on Saturday the 18th for the final leg, which will see the convoy reach Brescia.

Among the Ferrari models that have taken part in the Tribute, the 365 GTB/4 Competizione and Dino 246 GTS from 1972 have not gone unnoticed. Nor have the 1981 512 BBi or the 1990 F40. Drivers have included two from Ferrari Challenge Europe, novice Frederik Espersen and old hand Christian Overgaard, behind the wheels of a 599 GTO and a 488 Pista Piloti Ferrari respectively.

Ferrari